Today in Johnson City History: March 26

By Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press

March 26, 1892: T.E. Matson was elected mayor. He ran against E.H. Stebens, with a total of 953 votes being cast. At that time, Johnson City was divided into four wards.

March 26, 1910: Two revivals were in progress in Johnson City with large attendance. The Rev. J. Edmund Brown, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, was assisted by the the Rev. J. Lynn Bachman of Sweetwater, with the Rev. T.M.P. Woods of Plumtree, North Carolina, in charge of the choir. Meanwhile the Rev. J.J. Robinette, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was assisted by L.H. Baker of Berkley, California.

March 26, 1941: State Teachers College President C.C. Sherrod confirmed reports he had rejected the terms of an offer to be Knoxville’s school superintendent but noted negotiations were ongoing.

Former U.S. Vice President Albert Gore Jr. speaks about climate change at East Tennessee State University’s mini-dome, March 26, 2009.

March 26, 2009: Former U.S. Vice President Albert Gore Jr. spoke about climate change at East Tennessee State University’s mini-dome.

Sources: Archives of Appalachia, Mary Hardin McCown Collection; The Comet; Kingsport Times; Johnson City Press

Today in Johnson City History: March 25

By Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press

March 25, 1885: Johnson City was granted a new charter. Col. Seth H. Yokum was elected mayor.

March 25, 1909: General agent M.L. Fox warned in an ad in The Comet that lot prices would soon rise by 50 percent in the new Southwest Addition (the Tree Streets). “A large number of good houses are now under contract, costing from $3,000 to $25,000. Now is the time to buy and to build.”

March 25, 1941: The Appalachian Kennel Club’s annual AKC Dog Show got underway at Liggett and Meyers Warehouse in Johnson City.

March 25, 1971: A group of Tri-Cities legislators, local government officials and medical professionals met with Tennessee Gov. Winfield Dunn about the proposed college of medicine for East Tennessee State University. Dunn ultimately vetoed the bill to establish the medical school, but the Legislature overrode the veto in March 1974.

Sources: Archives of Appalachia, Mary Hardin McCown Collection; Johnson City Press-Chronicle.

Today in Johnson City History: March 24

By Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press

March 24, 1887: The Comet reported that Mayor W.A. Dickinson had eaten hash for dinner the previous night.

March 24, 1904: The Comet reported that passenger train No. 22 struck a team of horses at a road crossing near Limestone, instantly killing the horses and driver, who was identified as a Mr. Collette.

March 24, 1958: The Veterans Hospital at Mountain Home was amid an influenza epidemic that forced visitation restrictions. At the outbreak’s peak, the hospital was treating more than 100 flu cases.

March 24, 2017: The newly-formed East Tennessee State University Board of Trustees held its initial quarterly meeting.

Sources: The Comet; Johnson City Press-Chronicle; ETSU

Today in Johnson City History: March 23

By Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press

March 23, 1899: The Comet reported that the state Legislature had passed a bill that in effect permitted Tennessee Medical College graduates to practice medicine in Tennessee without a licensing exam by the state board of medical examiners. The graduates of all colleges outside the state would still have to be examined.

March 23, 1937: The U.S. Navy announced that Johnson City would be home to a permanent recruiting station.

March 23, 1969: The Johnson City Press-Chronicle published a special Johnson City Centennial section, “For and About Women.”

March 23, 2013: As East Tennessee State University started the first game of a doubleheader, Little Leaguers Trenten Carr, Dalten Carr and Brysen Orsborne came dressed in uniform to gain free admission for the game at Thomas Stadium during Little League Weekend.

Sources: The Comet; Kingsport Times; Johnson City Press-Chronicle; Johnson City Press.

Today in Johnson City History: March 22

By Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press

March 22, 1884: The Comet reported that Miss Lathan, who was a traveling agent for the “Sunny South,” a literary magazine, had spent a day in Johnson City. “With her charm, she was able to sell quite a few subscriptions.”

March 22, 1947: Appalachian Baseball League added veteran umpires Dick McNabb and Roscoe Shepard to its ranks, league President Carl A. Jones Jr. announced. Jones was the longtime publisher of the Johnson City Press-Chronicle, predecessor of the Johnson City Press, at the time.

March 22, 1977: A glass shortage was blamed as Johnson City’s Coca-Cola bottler doubled deposit costs. A case that had been $1.50 went up to $3 — just for the bottles. Some customers could take advantage of the increase by cashing in any old bottles in storage, doubling their return.

March 22, 2010: Johnson City Police Chief John Lowry announced two more intersections would be monitored by red light cameras: State of Franklin Road and Browns Mill Road — just below Wal-Mart near I-26 — and North Roan Street and Springbrook Drive near the Peerless Center.

Sources: The Comet; Johnson City Press-Chronicle; Kingsport News; Johnson City Press.

Today in Johnson City History: March 21

By Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press

March 21, 1912: The Johnson City Staff reported that Sen. Robert Taylor was very ill with gallstones, adding that he would likely have surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital shortly.

March 21, 1943: The Appalachian Baseball League Board of Directors met in Johnson City and agreed to admit the Erwin Aces to the league. The Aces featured former Major League pitcher Herman Fink. They joined the Johnson City Cardinals, the Bristol Twins and the Kingsport Cherokees in the Appy League.

March 21, 1975: Daniel Boone High School’s Trailblazers defeated Science Hill’s Hilltoppers 8-7 in baseball on a sacrifice fly in the bottom of the seventh inning. Boone senior Andy Blevins led hitting with two singles in four trips to the plate, knocking in three runs. Johnson City’s Morgan Littleford also knocked in three runs with three singles and a double in five at bats.

March 21, 2018: The first day of spring brought snow-covered flowers to Johnson City.

Sources: Johnson City Staff; Johnson City Press-Chronicle; Johnson City Press

Today in Johnson City History: March 20

By Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press

March 20, 1890: A representative from Philadelphia-based Young Brothers, the country’s largest water works builders, arrived in Johnson City to begin development of the city’s new water plant. The Watauga Water Company had been chartered in Tennessee earlier in the week. The contract between the city and the company called for the plant to be completed within a year. The Comet opined that it was safe to say Johnson City would have the largest and best water system in East Tennessee.

March 20, 1964: Johnson City resident Mrs. Ada Hawley Rogers was named Tennessee’s “Mother of the Year” by Gov. Frank Clement.

March 20, 2006: An unexpected snowfall struck Johnson City on the first day of spring.

March 20, 2018: Science Hill High School senior Junior Danso kicked off the Hilltoppers’ first home soccer game of the season with first-half goal at Kermit Tipton Stadium to beat Bearden 1-0 in a non-conference game.

Sources: The Comet; Johnson City Press-Chronicle; Johnson City Press.

Today in Johnson City History: March 19

By REBECCA HENDERSON and JOHNSON CITY PRESS

March 19, 1896: The Comet reported that Col. J.W.S. Frierson, Tennessee centennial commissioner for East Tennessee, had been in Johnson City en route home to Knoxville from a visit to Carter County. “He says there is no doubt but what the centennial will be the biggest thing of the kind ever held in the United States excepting, of course, the World’s Fair. He says Washington County ought to make a good appropriation, as it is the birthplace of the state.”

March 19, 1910: The Watauga restaurant, which was near the passenger depot, advertised small porterhouse and sirloin steaks for 25 cents each. That’s the equivalent of $6.80 today. A medium was 35 cents ($9.53 today). Think you could find a porterhouse for under $10 in 2019?

March 19, 1969: As part of Johnson City’s Centennial celebration, Steed College, Empire Furniture Company, Tennessee Tank Corporation and Johnson City Spring and Bedding Company all had open houses.

March 19, 2011: East Tennessee State University’s Quillen College of Medicine received its largest grant to date. The $9.1 million National Institutes of Health award was provided to renovate the college’s biomedical research laboratories and offices.

Source: The Comet; Archives of Appalachia, Mary Hardin McCown Collection; Johnson City Press.

Today in Johnson City History: March 18

By Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press

March 18, 1897: The Comet reported that an enormous rockslide between Blevins and Allentown prevented the narrow gauge train from arriving in Johnson City the previous day. No train was available on the Johnson City side of the slide, and mail had to be delivered on a lever cart.

March 18, 1976: Elvis Presley began a three-day series of concerts at Freedom Hall Civic Center. Tickets were $10 and $12.50, with all seats selling out for each show.

March 18, 1978: Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn were at Freedom Hall. Tickets were $5.50 and $6.50.

March 17, 2006: Former Science Hill High School basketball coach and principal George Pitts was named head coach at King College in Bristol. Pitts spent 15 years at Science Hill, guiding the Hilltoppers to three Class AAA state championships and one runner-up finish.

Sources: The Comet; Vince Staten; Johnson City Press.

Today in Johnson City History: March 17

By Rebecca Henderson and Johnson City Press

March 17, 1898: The Comet reported that Johnson City’s Dr. L.B. Caldwell had just been granted a patent on a Station Indicator, “and in time there is no doubt but what all the street car lines of the country will use it.”

March 17, 1966: Mary Elsie White, executive director of the Johnson City Girl Scout Council for more than 20 years, was honored for her work with the organization. The Business and Professional Women’s Club had also recently honored her.

March 17, 1971: The “Miracle Mall” opened in Johnson City.

March 17, 2012: Niswonger Children’s Hospital held “Broadway Comes to Greeneville” for the first time.

Sources: The Comet; Col. Gary McAllister; Johnson City Press-Chronicle; Cookie McKinney